A Near-Death Experience: Hitchhiking Around the World Days 32 and 33

“I thought that the tall grass would be a safe, well-hidden place for sleeping in, but I was forced out of my sleeping bag just after sunrise by a man driving a lawnmower inches away from my tent.”

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I spent a total of 3 days in the small town of Konin. It was my first experience of Couchsurfing, which I have been using throughout my trip as a way of meeting local people and learning about what life is really like in the places I visit.

Marcin and his family were very hospitable. They showed me around their town and surrounding area, and even paid for my bus tickets. Thanks again!

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The next stop on my hitchhiking adventure was Suwalki, Poland’s coldest town in the North-East. The border town would be my final break in Poland before entering Lithuania. I arranged to stay with another Couchsurfing host, Julia, and told her that I would arrive in just one day.

It was about 500km there, which was achievable, if I didn’t make any mistakes, with the summer daylight hours I had been blessed with.

 

Mistakes were made

I stood at the outskirts of Konin, where the settlement stopped and road carried on into the emptiness, with the damp grey sky teasing me with the chance of rain. Traffic was low and I realized I was already in a difficult situation.

I held up my sign and the drivers just passed by. They didn’t even acknowledge me, which is always a bad sign. I waited for over an hour before the woman pictured below finally pulled in. She wasn’t even going on the motorway but she took me there anyway. She then went on to ask drivers for me using her female charm, quickly securing me a lift to Warsaw.

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I was on the highway now, and it felt as if my luck had returned. My new driver, Pawel, even bought me a coffee, some food and a bottle of water. He had traveled in the same way that I am now, and we talked about how, on journeys like ours, one’s mood can quickly change from an overwhelming high to a crippling low. During this ride, I was on a high, and I was about to prove our observation.

He left me somewhere with a lot of traffic, and I felt positive; It was somewhere I’d normally wait for no more than 20 minutes. But I stood there, looking like an untalented street-performer, for over two hours. If you wait for an abnormal amount of time, then you are most likely doing something wrong. Perhaps the cars were going too fast, or I wasn’t visible enough. regardless, I decided to walk on in the hope of finding a petrol station.

The pavement blended into the road and I was now putting myself at risk. Luckily, someone pulled in because he thought the same; I wasn’t even putting my thumb out.

We passed a large service station, which would have been perfect to continue with, but I became greedy and decided to go on with him. He took me a total of about 50km, but left me somewhere with almost non-existent traffic.

I had to illegally walk on the motorway. After an anxious and exhausting 3 hours, a petrol station finally came into view. My excitement quickly turned to distress when I realized it was as underused as the road. It was old, badly-kept and receding into nature. ‘I could be here for days,’ I realized.

But there are always people in every flow of traffic who have hitchhiked, and they will always stop if they’re going the same way; it’s just a case of how long you have to wait. This theory kept me hopeful, and before too long I was taken back to the big service station I’d stupidly missed the first time round.

I was back in it, only having lost about half a day. I had to get going because my host in Suwalki was calling me, wondering where I was. I got picked up fairly quickly again and taken another 100km.

The sun set as we approached my final hitchhiking spot. I now only had about an hour of sunlight left. Nobody stopped, and I finally accepted I wasn’t going to make it in time. I begrudgingly messaged my host, telling her that I wouldn’t arrive for the special meal she’d prepared for me. With that, I retreated to some tall grass on the roadside to setup my tent for the evening. I reflected on the day, recognizing that it was just a bad one. It wasn’t over yet though, tomorrow would be just as bad!

 

The next day

I thought that the tall grass would be a safe, well-hidden place for sleeping in, but I was forced out of my sleeping bag just after sunrise by a man driving a lawnmower inches away from my tent. I’m assuming he saw me, because his trail indicated he deliberately steered around me.

I waited at the same spot as last night for a further 2 hours before thinking, yet again, that I was doing something wrong. I walked 5km back on myself to a petrol station which was, again, very empty. There were, however, a few trucks coming in, about one every 30 minutes. I was still very scared to ask people for a lift at this point of the adventure, but it was my only chance.

A truck with Lithuanian number plate pulled in first. ‘ I could be out of here’, I thought. I enthusiastically asked him to take me, in my best Russian, but he just said ‘No’. This went on for about 3 hours.

Finally, another driver with a Latvian number plate pulled in. He could see how desperate I was, and he laughed at that. Out of pity, he agreed to me to Suwalki.

It was a short ride of about an hour, and I waited for my host to finish work in a small café. Out of nowhere, a menacing rainstorm took over the skies. Wind seemed to challenge the structural integrity of the building and the rain forced people off the streets. When I met my host, she told me an annual storm had arrived, and that I was very lucky to have gotten picked up when I did.

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