Getting Lucky in a McDonald’s – Hitchhiking Around the World Day 27-32

On 1 June 2017, I left the small English town of Falmouth to hitchhike alone around the world.

After a month-long 3100km sprint from Falmouth, I had arrived in Poland and I needed to rest. I found a cheap hostel which was empty and slept 10-12 hours every night and 2-3 during the day. Despite this, I was still very tired when I left. I wasn’t sure why at the time, but now I know; hitchhiking means you are always thinking, worrying, assessing and deciding. ‘Do they know where I want to get out?’ ‘Will they let me out?’ ‘Are they dangerous?’ ‘What would I do if they turned out to be? Even though I am standing and sitting most of the time, it is exhausting. Exhausting isn’t a good enough word; most nights are spent outside and I never properly rest when I’m illegally sleeping outside of a motorway service station.

When I wasn’t sleeping, I spent some time taking the place in. This new country felt very different to Germany, where I’d just come from. I noticed a lot of tower blocks and other buildings that felt very Soviet influenced – cold, concrete, communist and created equally. Poland used to be under Russian command and some buildings had been painted with bright colors to cover this, but they were still ugly.

Despite the ex-soviet introduction, the city was beautiful; it was colorful and full of creativity and inspiration.

19598685_1735185050112029_2285230181382446214_n (1).jpg

After 3 days, I was (kind of ) ready for the next push to Konin, a small town that travelers rarely go to. I’m not a fan of cities. They’re busy, uncomfortable, dirty, expensive and I don’t feel that they should represent the country. When people say they’ve been to England and have only visited London, I don’t feel they’ve really experienced my country. I figured then, when I visit other countries, that I would avoid capital cities. I chose to miss Warsaw.

I walked for a couple of hours out of Wroclaw, new cardboard sign in hand, and began hitching. I got picked up within a few seconds by a man named Patryk. He was about 27, friendly, talkative. He could speak English very well and told me about the difficulty of life in Poland; the living wage is too low and the cost of living too high. He gets paid around £377/month and rents a room that costs about the same. I finally understood why so many Polish emigrate to places like Germany and England. And it’s no wonder the people seem so cold and paranoid.

19601335_1736175380012996_3187885278488409258_n.jpgAs we approached the place where he had to leave me, a deep blue storm was fast approaching with its menacing clouds. When Patryk dropped me off, it began to rain quite heavily. Luckily I was right next to a McDonald’s, where I rushed in to get a coffee. I stayed there for a few comfortable hours, writing my diary and sipping coffee in the warmth. It’s a hard life.

19642789_1736291136668087_911743526923305899_n.jpg

I’m not sponsored by McDonald’s, but their restaurants are safe places for me while hitchhiking; no matter where I am in the world, there’s always WiFi, electricity, warmth, seats and coffee. If I ever need a place to find my bearings and I see the golden arches, I hate to say it, but I know I’ll be okay.

It took so long for the rain to pass, that when I finally emerged from the building it was already sunset. I found a roadside camping spot and passed out for another 12 hours. The next day I was picked up promptly and taken the rest of the way to Konin.

19702547_1736752493288618_4424952267586244217_n.jpg

 

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s